Stories of Light

Bizan's Story

He saw Isis face to face and survived. Rescued by the Pashmerga, he fled to Khanke, feeling the depth of his loss. Tutapona taught him that he didn’t need to be stuck where he was. Now, he is studying to be a teacher to bring hope to others. Bizan is a light to his peers.

Nadia's Story

Her mother saved her life by covering her from the hail of bullets that killed her uncles. She lost her father, her grandfather, her peace. But then she snuck into a Tutapona program and found healing. Nadia inspired us to write a children’s program. She is a light to children around the world.

Kado's Story

Kado had a good life – he was working, he had a small farm. He had everything he needed, that is until the rebels came. With his injured wife they ran, with nothing but the shirts on their back. He thought his life was over, but Tutapona told him he could start again. Kado is now a light in Nakivale.

Francine's Story

The only thing that kept her alive, was her children. She met Tutapona right at the time she was at her lowest. She learned about the power of community. Now, she lives not only for her children, but to others in her village. Francine is a light to her neighbours.

Shana's Story

She was held in captivity for 2 and a half years, sold as a ‘wife’ to an ISIS soldier. Her son developed a disability and when she finally escaped she felt like life was over. But then she discovered hope. Shana is a light to her son.

Rasm's Story

He had everything, he was his community leader, wealthy & influential, until ISIS came and took it all. He had to run, feeling like a coward, like a man full of shame. But now he is full of confidence and hope. Rasm is a light to his community.

Julien's Story

He was forced to watch as his wife suffered through a nightmare. Then his family was gone, along with them, his sanity. But then Tutapona came to visit and he found life again. Julian is a light to his wife & children.

Agnes' Story

No mother should ever have to watch her child die. Especially when that child was supposed to be safe. No mother should have to broker a peace deal between two tribes to put an end to retribution killings. But that’s what she did, because she was taught that revenge only causes more pain. Agnes is a light in her tribe.

Jeanin's Story

The soldiers found her in her garden. It left her broken – in her heart and in her mind. She tried to end it all. But hope saved her life. Jeanin is a light to her husband and to her children.

Hana's Story

She was only 9 years old the day that ISIS came. Her harrowing journey to safety included a mountainous trek across deadly terrain, leaving her broken and plagued with negative thoughts. But then she heard about Tutapona and learned to think in a positive way. Hana is a light to other children in Khanke.

Nahema's Story

After escaping to a ‘safe’ place, she continued to experience horrors unspeakable. She had no where to turn, no hope of justice or redemption.But then a friend told her about Tutapona and she found healing. Nahema is a light to her children and other women in her community.

Sami's Story

ISIS circled around his village so that no one could escape. His family fled through crossfire to save their lives. No food, no water, and a week hiding in the mountains. But Tutapona taught him about forgiveness. Sami is a light in his family.

Films of Hope

Gilya

 

"I try to provide everything for my family, as much as I can."

 

Jalil

 

"I learned about helping myself so I can help other people."

 

Hana

 

"I'm believing in God that good things will happen to me."

 

Sami

 

"The burning in my heart has gone down. I am healed."

 

Julien

 

"We are getting our lives back and I have hope"

 

Jeanin

“I still have my life, and therefore I have hope.”

Shana

 

"They taught us that we have hope, and a future"

 

Agnes

 

"We can be in peace only when we come together"

 

Francine

"I’m free now, and very happy because of Tutapona."

 

Nahema

"My new son, born from the last attack, is named Tutapona."

 

Kado

"I learned with Tutapona that I could live again."

 

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